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Palau TWO SISTERS by RENOIR series MICROPUZZLE TREASURES $20 Silver Coin 2020 Proof 3 oz


$979.90

Notes: FREE INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING
Product Code: PC-S-MT-20-01
Availability: In Stock, ship in April
Name of series
Great Micromosaic Passion > Click to view
Specifications
Metal Silver
Mintage 499
Fineness (% purity) 99.9%
Denomination (USD) $20
Weight (g) 93.30
Size (mm) 65
Year of Issue 2020
Country Palau
Quality Proof
Exterior Decoration 254 minted puzzle tiles; Serial number on the edge
Package Wooden box
Certificate of Authenticity with a serial number
Serial number Yes
VAT or Tax will be refunded if charged in your country
Free Local & International shipping
 
Two Sisters or On the Terrace is an 1881 oil-on-canvas painting by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The dimensions of the painting are 100.5 cm × 81 cm. The title Two Sisters (French: Les Deux Sœurs) was given to the painting by Renoir, and the title On the Terrace (French: Sur la terrasse) by its first owner Paul Durand-Ruel.
 
Renoir worked on the painting on the terrace of the Maison Fournaise, a restaurant located on an island in the Seine in Chatou, the western suburb of Paris. The painting depicts a young woman and her younger sister seated outdoors with a small basket containing balls of wool. Over the railings of the terrace one can see shrubbery and foliage with the River Seine behind it.
 
In 1880 to 1881, shortly before working on Two Sisters, Renoir worked in this particular location on another well-known painting, Luncheon of the Boating Party.
 
Jeanne Darlot (1863—1914), a future actress who was 18 years old at the time, was posing as "the elder sister." It is unknown who posed as the "younger sister," but it is stated that the models were not actually related.
 
Renoir began work on the painting in April 1881 and on July 7, 1881, it was bought by the art dealer, Paul Durand-Ruel, for 1,500 francs. The painting was presented for the first time to the public at the 7th Impressionist exhibition in the spring of 1882. In 1883 it was known to be in the collection of Charles Ephrussi, an art collector and a publisher, but in 1892 the painting was returned again to the collection of the Durand-Ruel family.
 
In 1925, the painting was sold to Annie Swan Coburn from Chicago for $100,000. After her death in 1932 the painting was bequeathed to the Art Institute of Chicago, where it has remained since 1933.
 
Your benefits
• High international collectible demand
• Appreciated in an investing in world collectible modern low mintage coins
• Beautiful coin to your loved one for any occasions or a great business gift

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